Masters with Specialization in Health Monitoring

 

M.S. Degree in Structural Engineering
with Specialization in Health Monitoring, Prognosis and Validated Simulations (SHMP&VS)

The M.S. degree in SHMP&VS provides specialized multidisciplinary knowledge in the three technology areas of

  1. Sensing Technology,
  2. Data Interrogation, and
  3. Predictive Modeling.

Many courses currently offered within the Jacobs School of Engineering may be grouped into numerous focus sequences within each technology area, as shown in the following list:

A. Sensing Technology Area

1. Sensing Methodologies Focus Sequence

SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE
MAE 261 Cardiovascular Fluid Mechanics (not offered 2011-12) 
MAE 268 Frontier Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems(MEMS) Materials and Devices (not offered 2011-12)

2. Data Acquisition Systems Focus Sequence

ECE 257B Principles of Wireless Networks
ECE 258A,B Digital Communications
ECE 259C Advanced Coding and Modulation for Digital Communications  
MAE 261 Cardiovascular Fluid Mechanics (offered 2012-13) 
CSE 237A Introduction to Embedded Computing
CSE 237B Software for Embedded Computing
CSE 237C Validation/Testing of Embedded Systems
CSE 237D Design Automation and Prototyping for Embedded Systems

3. Controls Focus Sequence

MAE 280A Linear Systems Theory
MAE 280B Linear Control Design
MAE 282 Adaptive Control
MAE 284 Robust and Multi-Variable Control
MAE 285 Optimal Control and Estimation (to be split into MAE 285A and 285B in Fall 2005)

B. Data Interrogation Technology Area

1. Signal Processing Focus Sequence

ECE 161A Introduction to Digital Signal Processing 
ECE 251AN/SIO 207B Digital Signal Processing I
ECE 251B/SIO 207C Digital Signal Processing II 
ECE 251C Filter Banks and Wavelets 
ECE 251D or SIO 207D Array Processing 
ECE 253A Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing
ECE 253B Digital Image Analysis
ECE 254 Detection Theory
ECE 255A Information Theory

2. System Identification Focus Sequence

MAE 283A Parameter Identification: Theory and Methods
MAE 283B Approximate Identification and Control
ECE 256A,B Time Series Analysis and Applications
ECE 275A Parameter Estimation I
ECE 275B Parameter Estimation II

3. Pattern Recognition Focus Sequence

CSE 250A Artificial Intelligence: Search and Reasoning
CSE 250B Artificial Intelligence: Learning
CSE 254 Statistical Learning
ECE 270A,B,C Neurocomputing

4. Statistical/Probabilistic Methods Focus Sequence

MTH 281A, B,C Mathematical Statistics
CSE 254 Statistical Learning
SE 206 Random Vibrations
SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis

C. Predictive Modeling Technology Area

1. Structural Analysis Focus Sequence

SE 201A Advanced Structural Analysis 
SE 202 Structural Stability
SE 203 Structural Dynamics
SE 204 Advanced Structural Dynamics -- added
SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis

2. Finite Element Focus Sequence

SE 276A Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics I 
SE 276B Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics II 
SE 276C Advances in Materials Computations 
SE 274 Nonlinear Finite Elemental Methods

3. Solid Mechanics Focus Sequence

SE 235 Wave Propagation in Elastic Media
SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE
SE 271 Solid Mechanics for Structural and Aerospace Engineering
SE 272 Theory of Elasticity
SE 273/MAE 231C Anelasticity

4. Material Behavior/Modeling

MAE 233B Micromechanics
SE 276C/MAE 232C Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics III
MAE 273A Dynamic Behavior of Materials
  

5. Advanced Structural Behavior

SE 204 Advanced Structural Dynamics
SE 205 Nonlinear Mechanical Vibrations 
SE 206 Random Vibrations
SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis
SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE
SE 265 Structural Health Monitoring Principles

6. Earthquake Engineering Focus Sequence

SE 203 Structural Dynamics
SE 206 Random Vibrations
SE 221 Earthquake Engineering
SE 222 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering
SE 223 Advanced Seismic Design of Structures

7. Advanced Composites Focus Sequence

SE 253A Mechanics of Laminated Composite Structures I 
SE 254 FRP Rehabilitation of Civil Structures

Two degree plans in SHMP&VS will be offered: MS Thesis Plan and MS Comprehensive Examination Plan. Students in both plans must complete forty-eight units of credit for graduation. For both plans, students must complete thirty-six units of coursework consisting of one focus sequence from each of the three Technology Areas A, B and C listed above. Any three of the courses listed under a specific topic area constitutes a focus sequence. Courses must be chosen in consultation with the student’s adviser. The remaining twelve units must be completed as graduate research SE 299.

For the M.S. SHMP&VS Comprehensive Examination Plan, the 12-unit graduate research SE 299 must be conducted as a mentored research project. This project is intended to provide a mentored practicum whereby students integrate knowledge learned from their technology areas into comprehensively solving a problem from structural health monitoring/prognosis or model validation and uncertainty quantification, at their discretion. This project will emphasize professional practice, with both oral and written communication of technical data, and will include a strong design component. The project will be presented to a committee of two faculty members in Structural Engineering and one from another department within the Jacobs School of Engineering or an adjunct faculty member in an appropriate area of focus.

For the M.S. SHMP&VS Thesis Plan, the 12-unit graduate research SE 299 culminates with the preparation of a research thesis. The thesis must be successfully defended in an oral examination and public presentation conducted by a committee composed of three faculty members. The committee will be comprised of two faculty members in Structural Engineering and one from another department within the Jacobs School of Engineering or an adjunct faculty member in an appropriate area of focus. A complete copy of the student’s thesis must be submitted to each member of the MS thesis committee at least two weeks prior to the defense.

Because of the inherent multidisciplinary nature of the M.S. SHMP&VS degree, conduction of research within SE 299 can be performed at outside locations (industry or government facilities). In this case a scientist on location, with an adjunct faculty appointment at UCSD, will be part of the student’s committee. The degree is also available to students working in industry or government laboratories that cannot be released from their duties for periods of more than 1-2 quarters. In these cases, UCSD courses taken via distance learning may be used to satisfy the course requirements. A scientist on location, with an adjunct faculty appointment at UCSD, must be part of the student’s committee.

Each quarter they are registered, all students in the M.S. SHMP&VS Comprehensive Examination Plan and all first-year students in the M.S. SHMP&VS Thesis Plan are required to enroll in the seminar course SE 290 (Invited Speakers). Each quarter they are registered, all second- and third-year students in the M.S. SHMP&VS Thesis Plan are required to enroll in the seminar course SE 291 (Graduate Student Presentations), although their attendance to the seminar course SE 290 (Invited Speakers) is strongly encouraged. For those students working in industry or government laboratories that cannot be released from their duties, successful completion of SE 290 or SE 291 will be obtained by attending an equivalent number of seminars at the off-site location that must be approved by a scientist on location with an adjunct faculty appointment at UCSD.